--0: node --1: 49132 --2:  --3: <<-->>/blog/sabya-effect--->>nilaya.asianpaints.com
Velvet and khadi, gypsy romance and Claude Monet, hand block printing and glamour, Raj era nostalgia and New York savvy. Only one man could weave all of this together into a coherent tale and create a mesmeric fashion adventure out of it all. And that man is Sabyasachi Mukherjee. NIFT graduate, Associate Designer Member of the Fashion Design Council of India and the youngest board member of the National Museum of Indian Cinema, costume designer for Bollywood films, custodian of India’s artistic traditions, the man who put Kolkata on the couture map.
 
And it doesn’t stop there. His Instagram page is addictive. He is an authority on what to wear on the red carpet. And if anyone has ownership over the colour red – it would be him with so many women swooning over his “Pomegranate Red”.
 
He writes too. Which makes him a renaissance man.
 
  
 
Visiting him at his workshop in Kolkata one is immediately struck by his powerhouse energy. There is never a quiet or dull moment. Caught up with simultaneous projects, Sabyasachi will amaze you with his up to the minute information on each one. Hands on is an understatement. When shown a dummy copy of a pattern book by a young graphic designer he immediately spots a missing swatch.
 
His work redefines India and the concept of Indian style glamour as he delves freely and with abandon into her treasure trove of artistic forms, translating them into modern expressions. Dark jewel tones play with muted shades accentuated with subtle texturing and indigenous embroidery. Echoes of 17th and 18th century paintings dance off the creations – like Brueghel and Monet. There is a definite gothic luxuriousness in every piece.
 
And now the untiring, indefatigable artist designs wallcoverings. Runaway, romantic fantasies that transform and elevate, delight the eye and mesmerize the mind. Designing once more for Nilaya, with Chapter II: India Revival Project, Sabyasachi produces a bouquet of floral beauties and Raj era inspired tableaus. The offerings are what every homeowner would wish for: sublime compositions that will turn any home into a palace of splendor.
 
 

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